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5 Tips to optimize your t-shirt ads on Facebook

Facebook says it treats all product ads equally, but based on my selling experience I would say this is not the case. There’s a difference in how my t-shirt ads perform versus other product types, so for this post we’ll focus on ads specifically designed for selling t-shirts (and other upper body apparel—hoodies, tanks, long-sleeve shirts, etc.).

1. Photo posts are still the best ROI type of ads for shirts

There are two main types of posts you can/should make as a Teespring seller; link posts and photo posts. When advertising individual shirts you should always use a photo post. I recommend a photo size of 1200 x 1650 pixels. You can also add a call-to-action (i.e. “order now”) at the bottom or top of the photo since the overall size of the image is larger.

  • Photo posts are different because when you click them, a “theater” opens up on Facebook to make the image larger. The user then has to click a link in the post text area  (as I’ve described in tip number 2) if they want to navigate to the landing page. Photo posts require a two-step (two clicks) process for users to get to your Teespring campaign.
  • Link posts require one step (click) to get to the landing page (i.e. Teespring product page). When a user clicks the link image they’re taken directly to the website.

Even though photo posts require an extra step from shoppers, they seem to work the best when it comes to generating more impressions, clicks, shares, etc. from your target audience. After you create either of these post types on Facebook, you can then pick the ad objective like PPE, Website Conversion, Lead Ad, Click To Website, etc.

2. Keep your post text short and sweet

Posts should have 3 short lines of text; I personally put a blank line in-between each of them for readability. This is how I organize my text:

Line 1: Question or statement to stop the user from scrolling in their Newsfeed

Line 2: Blank

Line 3: Click Here –> Link to Teespring campaign

Line 4: Blank

Line 5: Ask them to do something social like: Tag another “X” you know now! (fill in with biker, pitt mom, soccer dad, etc.—whoever the audience is designed for.)

Keep in mind it’s good practice to add variables to your links (see GET variables) because they can help you differentiate which ads are driving which conversions.

3. Use comments to draw attention to your product URL

It’s good practice to keep your campaign URL front and center—after all, the whole point of the ad is to get your audience to convert.  Try the following on your photo post; first, comment on the post with your variable link, then reply twice to the comment and paste the same link. Then like all 3 comments. This will force the comment to stay at the top of your post—making it easily accessible to people viewing your photo ad.

 

4. Choose the right objective for t-shirt ads

When creating a photo post ad, I would always recommend choosing “Website Conversion” as the ad objective. Of course, there are a few layers…but “Add To Cart” and/or “Purchase” objectives seem to work the best for me.

5. Look at ads from Facebook’s point of view

At the end of the day, Facebook’s main concern is NOT if your ad is generating sales or not.  Their main concern is their user’s experience. They know if they repeatedly let bad content into the Newsfeed, the user will eventually leave Facebook.  If that happens, both Facebook and advertisers lose out.

There are specific guidelines you should be aware of (to avoid ad violations), but often internet marketers need to push the envelop to get noticed. The trick is to walk this line without crossing over it. Also, keep in mind that Facebook constantly changes where this “line” is…and you can fully expect them to keep changing it to preserve their user experience across all of Facebook. Remember to keep your ear to the ground and pay attention to how your ads perform to ensure they’re fully optimized for conversions.

 

Ready to put these tips to the test?

 

 

 

9 responses to “5 Tips to optimize your t-shirt ads on Facebook

  1. Karen says:

    Tip #3 seems like a spam tactic. Why post the same link 3 times in comments and replies? The link is already in the original post…

    1. Karen says:

      and you don’t explain what the “links with variables” are or why you’re using them.

      1. Kate ShoafKate Shoaf says:

        Hey Karen – if you check the link we included at the end of number 2 it directs you to Teespring Analytics, where you can find more info on how GET Variables appear in your campaign analytics. This explanation might make a bit more sense.

    2. Kate ShoafKate Shoaf says:

      It’s a tactic many sellers use to keep the link at the top of the comments. Many times when a user sees something like this they check the comments to see what people are saying – and BOOM there’s the link (with link preview) where they can buy it!

      1. JD says:

        Re: Tip 3

        Do you need to be the first comment in the thread for this to work.

        Or if I comment like this on an old post will it push it to the top?

  2. Barry Canada says:

    Is this for a paid ad or a post you’re putting on a fan page, group or personal page?

    1. Kate ShoafKate Shoaf says:

      Hey Barry! The post is about paid ads from a page.

  3. Patrick says:

    Hello,

    Sorry for my bad English.
    Tip # 2 I tried this method. I’m a little discouraged. I have 830 likes, 210 shares but no sales. Is there anything more I can do? I tell myself that 830 likes, my design should not be bad.
    Thank you very much.

    1. Kate ShoafKate Shoaf says:

      Hey Patrick – you may want to look through some of these past success stories. Some sellers provide specific numbers on ad performance. You can also try asking other sellers in the Teespring forum.

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